Fantasy in the 19th and 20th century
SF/FANTASY
index

- Fantasy in the 19th century
continued
- The beginning of the 20th century
continued
...more
- The Inklings
- CS Lewis
- JRR Tolkien
- Types of Fantasy
continued
- Myths and Legends
- Secondary Worlds

  • George MacDonald

  • William Morris

  • Henry Rider Haggard

  • More links to sites about these fantasy authors can be found among my
    fantasy links
  • Fantasy in the 19th century, Henry Rider Haggard

    The 19th century, continued

    William Morris first novel with large-scaled fantasy was "The House of the Wolfings", 1889 which was about Saxons fighting with the Romes. With the Novel "The Story of the Glittering Plain, or The Land of the Living Men",1890 Morris way of writing started to look more like modern fantasy. "The Well at the Worlds End", 1896 is the most important of Morris pieces, with over a 1000 pages it is the longest fantasynovel before Tolkiens' trilogy. The story takes place in a world that looks very much like northwest England during the middle ages, although without influence by christians and with magic. Morris wrote in a complicated and long-winded english in an effort to look like the medieval prose of the 14th century, and can be difficult to read.

    Henry Rider Haggard (1858-1925) is another of the authors in the 19th century which were influent. He became famous with his third novel "King Solomon's Mines",1885, and when "She: A history of Adventure" became equally popular he became a fulltime author. His stories is often about an unknown culture, or an unknown people that is found. Haggard was a source for inspiration for, among others, Edgar Burroughs.

    - The beginning of the 20th century


    Books at Amazon.co.uk (England):
    The Well at the World's End
    Glittering Plain
    King Solomon's Mines
    She: A history of Adventure
    Ayesha : The Return of She

    Books at Amazon.com (USA):
    Three Adventure Novels: She, King Solomon's Mines, Allan Quatermain
    Ayesha : The Return of She

    http://www.edlin.org/sitemap.html
    Calle [emsworth [at] gmx [dot] net]